Oregon & Portland's Baseball History

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Early Portland Baseball History
Acknowledgements
Doing research for this paper I used a variety of sources: from the Internet, references, and two primary newspapers. A variety of materials came from the Oregon Historical Society, including some images. News media was pooled from the Oregon City Enterprise, Oregon Journal, and Oregonian newspapers. Statistical data was pooled from Baseball-Reference.com, "The Pacific Coast League: A Statistical History, 1903-1957" by Dennis Snelling, and once again The Oregon Journal and Oregonian newspapers.
--Maury Brown

Pre-Beaver Baseball
Before Joe Tinker, before Dave Bancroft, before Mike Mitchell, or Billy Southworth, before Satchel Paige, or even the great Jim Thorpe, baseball thrived in the later part of the 19th century in Portland. They were teams with great names such as the Pioneers, Portland Spartans, the Monograms, the Highland Baseball Club, Slabtown, the Portland Gladiators or the Vancouver Occidentials, and they played a variety of base-ball in fields, towns, and cities in and around Portland. The name Portland itself was drawn out of pure luck. Portland's roots-and its name-date back to a coin flip in 1845, the same year the New York Kickerbockers baseball club was created a coast away. Asa Lovejoy and Francis Pettygrove shared ownership of a choice 640-acre (259-hectare) clearing along the Willamette River, near its confluence with the Columbia. Lovejoy wanted to name the site "Boston," but Pettygrove won the coin toss and named it "Portland," after his hometown in Maine.

The Portland Pioneers
Sixteen years after the formation of Portland as a city, the first record of an organized baseball team in the Northwest is recorded on May 28, 1866. On this day the Pioneer Baseball Club of East Portland was created. Comprised of merchants, doctors, lawyers, and farmers from rural Portland, the club was considered a "gentlemen's" group. As was the norm for the day, professionals were not allowed, and the "Club" was strictly for members to partake in for social purposes. The club had elected officials and a dues system: $.50 to help pay for the expense of $1.00 baseballs, and $2.50 for bats.

The first games played by this club appear to have taken place on a vacant lot owned by Stimpson and Estes on Washington Street. Other games were played near Broadway and Stark downtown, but as time moved on the team played in fields on the east side of Portland, just over the Willamette, hence the name "East" in the clubs name. The team played the best games on Clinton and McCoy field, the only field in town with a half-enclosed grandstand and bleachers.

The first nine of the first game, were elected by ballot - not picked by the manager - to the positions that they were to play. T.F. Miner was the catcher for pitcher Ed Quackenbush. The infield consisted of Ward K. Witherell at first, Wadshams at second, Frank M. Ward at third, and James B. Upton playing shortstop. The outfielders were Joe Butchtel in left, James Steel in center, and Peter De Huff in right.

The Pioneers are on record as playing the Clackamas Club and winning handily 77-46. As was the case in early baseball rules were different. Under hand pitching was used, and batters called where they wanted a pitch over the plate. Scores of this nature were not uncommon at the time given the differences in the rules from today's game. When the game was completed the teams retired themselves to a feast at Barlow House while the Oregon City Brass Band played. After the Pioneers first game, the idea of "electing" players to positions was changed to assignment by the Captain of the team. Since this was a gentlemen's club, a system of fining players was introduced as well for unseemly conduct. Profanity, arguing with the umpire, or disobedience to the captain by a player resulted in a $.10 fine. It seems that then, as today, players were known to not exactly adhere to these rules. It seems several pages of fines fill the pages of the Club's record book.

On October 1, 1867, the Pioneer Base Ball Club invited representatives from other clubs to a meeting in February of 1868 to form a players association. Joe Buchtel was elected president of the five-team group that included the Pioneers, the Spartans of Portland, the Highland Base Ball Club, the Clackamas Club from Oregon City, and the Vancouver Occidentals, which included soldiers from the Ft. Vancouver garrison, with local civilians rounding out the Occidentals squad. The group operated under the long-winded name of "The Oregon and Washington and Idaho Territories Association of Base Ball Players". The rules used by the "Association" were adopted from the 1863 rules set down by the National Association of Ball Players that resided in New York, and modified for the Northwest group.

The a fore mentioned Joe Buchtel was the person most acknowledged as popularizing baseball in Oregon in the later part of the 19th century. In a short period of time Buchtel went from elected director, to captain, to manager/player. He was a pitcher and an outfielder when the Pioneer Club won at least two "State" championship at the Oregon State Fair. Fleet of foot, Buchtel was said to have run 150 yards in fifteen seconds. In 1874 Buchtel reorganized the team and 2 years later won the Centennial baseball championship and medal playing against the Clackamas Club, Vancouver Occidentals, and Willamette University.


The Willamettes, Gladiators, and the Pacific Northwest League (PNL)
While Joe Buchtel would play and manage for the Pioneers for 15 years, in 1884 he organized the next great team to come out of Portland, the Willamettes of East Portland. Out of the team that consisted of Joe Buchtel, and his son Fred, that played shortstop, came the Parrott family that dominated the team. Thomas Parrott was born April 10 1868 and played, and influenced baseball in Oregon well into the next century. His son Tom, Jr. who was known as "Tacky Tom", or "Tax" played from 1893 - 1896 professionally in the Majors for the Chicago Colts, Cincinnati Reds, and St. Louis Browns where he hit .301 for his career, and was one shy of 1000 AB. He left an indelible mark on Oregon baseball, through his children that continued to play.

One of his sons, Walter "Jiggs" Parrott played four seasons with the Chicago Colts from 1892 - 1895, and had 1309 AB with a .235 BA. His third son Armondo Guido Parrott pitched for the Willamettes but never went to the Bigs.

Between the Buchtels, Parrotts and the rest of the team under manager Joe Beveridge, the Willamettes moved beyond playing games just within the Portland area. On opening day 1884, the Club beat the Seattle Browns 1-0, at Riverside ballfield, and another team the Portlanders defeated San Francisco, 5-3, at the Clinton and McCoy grounds in East Portland. Pitching for the Portlanders was the first acknowledged professional player in Portland, Bill "Turk" Burke. Burke would later in 1887 pitch for the Detroit Wolverines team that won the NL pennant that season. Burke only pitched 15 innings his entire career in the Majors, had 21 hits, 10 ER, and an ERA of 6.00.

So successful was this team, that in 1890 they became the Portland Gladiators. This team helped organize the first fully professional organization, the Pacific Northwest League (PNL). This league consisted of Portland, Seattle, Tacoma, and Spokane. Making the transition from the amateur Willamettes to the professional Gladiators were Fred Buchtel, "Jiggs" Parrott, and Tom Parrott. The league soon was filled with players from leagues in Texas, the Midwest and New York.

In 1891, the Gladiators played 94 games to win the league championship. During that season they also played teams from the California League, which included Sacramento, San Francisco, and San Jose. After that 1891 season the Parrott brothers left for the Majors, and the PNL was unknowingly getting ready for a coup after the next season, lasting but two short years in it's original form which we will get to later.

The Portland Monograms
Another "18 and over" professional team that brought fame to Oregon, was the Portland Monograms. They consisted of Cal Geil (C), Claude Schmeer (SS), Charles Ray (P), Al Webber (P), Archie Parrot (1B), of the a fore mentioned Parrott Family, M. Donovan (OF- C), Al Webber (2B), F. Townsend (P), Joe DeBurgh (OF-R), H. Nash (P), Danny Shea (C), Frank Busby (OF-L), and Manager Nick Whitehead. The Monograms began in 1896 when Cal Geil assembled some "neighborhood kids", mostly from Central and North Central High Schools in a barn on East 12th and Pine St. with the idea of forming the best baseball team possible, saying that "the best substitutes would be just that." Geil, 18 years of age, gathered kids from around, what was then called Central and North central on the East side of the Willamette. They practiced on a field known only as "The Graders" in the area of NE Flanders to NE Hoyt and NE 9th to NE 11th. Games were played at a place called the Buckman field site.

The Monograms played in Portland against team with names like South Portland, Goose Hollow, Slabtown, the Phoenix team, the Vancouver Maroons, Oregon City, and St. Helens. The team beat all comers setting up a playoff with the Washington State Champion Tacoma Four Spots for the right to go to San Francisco and play the California champion in a Pacific tournament sponsored by the San Francisco Examiner. The Monograms beat the Four Spots 10-1 to advance.

The team booked the steamer Columbia through their newly acquired business manager Morris Whitehead, and boarded with their equally new coach, Ed "Trilby" Rankin, and set forth for San Francisco. The trip started auspiciously when the Monograms star pitcher Howard Nash failed to make the trip due to illness, and proceeded to get worse as the entire team got seasick on the trip, and the catcher Danny Shea somehow got injured en-route as well.

The team was greeted with a parade, and 17,000 witnessed the first game the Monograms played in San Francisco ending in a 12-12 tie. The game was called due to darkness, although accounts say that the sun was still shining. Geil concluded that the game was called due to weariness of the players, and the fact that game officials smelled more profits if a second game was played the next day. It should be noted that Seals games at the time were pulling in barely 1,000 per game, so promoters looked to reap the rewards of two games instead of one.

The next day saw another 17,000 fans turn out to see the San Francisco beat the Monograms in a heart breaking 16-14 loss. The Monograms had a 14-13 lead going into the 9th, but a substitute pitcher tossed a pitch over the plate that resulted in homer that drove in 3 runs. It is believed that the large crowds that turned out to see a California League team play a team from Portland planted the seed in the owners minds that would create the coup that resulted in two leagues merging under the noses of the Pacific Northwest League, and therefore creating the Pacific Coast League.

The Portland Beavers, and Vaughn St. Park

The beginnings of "Vaughn St. Park"
It was a place where the Red Sox discovered Ted Williams. It was where the great Joe Tinker first played; it lived through a massive 3-alarm fire, and numerous flooding, and it was the heart and soul of the city until it simply died of old age.

On a Wednesday morning that started cold and drizzly, and end in a downpour; May 22, 1901 to be exact, the face of baseball in Portland would take on it's greatest change, and be a day that would mark the beginning of 55 seasons of great baseball in Portland. It was on that Wednesday that the first game was played at Vaughn Street Park (or as it was called for a short time "Recreation Park", or simply the "Baseball Park") in NW Portland. The park, the product of two streetcar company owners E.I. Fuller, and C.F. Swigert, was built on the corner of NW 24th and Vaughn St. It was built for the same reasons as current day owners build parks… to make money. Fuller's Portland Railway Co. owned the land that the park was on, and the company's had a car that ran on 23rd street, just adjacent to the park. Swigert's "City & Suburban" streetcar company had their "S" line terminated a block before the park at NW 24th and Savier. The idea was simple… increase fares on both streetcar lines, and make money at the turnstiles.

Up until that time Portland had been without baseball from the time the Monograms played in 1896 when the Pacific Northwest League collapsed in June of that year. The league was revived in 1901 and when the National Association was organized, the league became a Class B member. While Fuller and Swigert owned the park, a group of prominent business owners, spearheaded by well-known baseball promoter named William H. Lucas, decided that the best way to bring favorable publicity to an ambitious young city was to bring in a baseball club. So began the Portland Baseball Club, as the ownership group charged with a team for 1901 called the Webfooters.

On April 7th of 1901 it was announced that Jack Grimm had been signed as manager. The team included a 3 pitcher roster that worked 5 days a week (Wednesday through Sunday). They included William A. Salisbury, George Engel, and Lew Mahaffey who was also used at 1B. The other positions were Sammy Vigneau at catcher; Jack Grimm at first and backup at catcher; Andy Anderson at 2B; Jake Diesel at short, and the great Joe Tinker at third. The outfield was Max Mueller, and Bob Brown, who would go on to be an owner of Vancouver, B.C., and president of the W-1 league. Fred Weed was the third outfielder to round out the team. The players came from around the nation's different baseball leagues. From the New York State and New England Leagues to the Connecticut State League, but it was a player originally from Montana league, that would one day be in the Hall of Fame, and be known the league over for his out- standing play at shortstop. Joe Tinker played 3rd base for the Webfooters in 1901, and would go on to the Hall of fame as part of the great Cubs infield of Tinker-Evers-Chance. And the relationship of Tinker and Evers goes down as one of the great stories in baseball history, as Tinker and Evers had a 33 year rift between each other that started with a cab fare, and escalated into a brawl on the field. It wasn't until, unbeknownst to one another, both were invited to help broadcast the 1938 Cubs World Series that they made up their differences and made amends.

All in all the Webfooters were an outstanding team, and went on to win the championship that 1901 season, but the remaining years of the team would not be anything near as good as the first. As the 1902 season approached two more teams were added to the PNL with Butte and Helena, Montana making a total of 6. Portland would finish 4th, and be a disappointment from the year before. To exacerbate the problem the new manager, catcher Sam Vigneau got into an argument with an umpire named McDermott and the league president ruled Vigneau out of line and was suspended by league president Lucas. The war rumbling was on, as shareholders of the team took issue with the suspension, and the director of the, Jack Marshall issued hints that the team might do better in another league.

Portland goes "outlaw"
Into this volatile atmosphere came an innocent article that ran on December 10th of 1902. It seems the owner of the San Francisco club, a Mr. Henry Harris, was hinting that the outlaw California League was thinking of expanding. Harris assured the Oregonian that the trip to Portland had "nothing what so ever to do with baseball."

Yet, the next day in Seattle, Harris dropped the bombshell that everything had been arranged "for Portland and Seattle to join the California league in its northwest expansion to six teams, under the name Pacific Coast League." What followed was pure chaos among the shareholders of the Portland team. President of the club, T.A. Whitemore declared that he would stick with Lucas and the PNL. Jack Marshall, on the other hand, who was Director of the team, and who had instigated the merger with the California league had obviously jumped ship. Much rumbling in sued with the city leaders caught smack dab in the center. Mayor George H. Williams was quoted as saying: "I know nothing about the baseball war and do not care to know much about it. What I want to see are good baseball games and plenty of them."

Finally, President Lucas issued a threat to match the new Coast league, if it actually went through with the "steal" and that the PNL would snatch teams from the California league as well. Lucas added that he had the full support, and backing of organized baseball, and unlimited funds to defeat and raid the California teams. This war raged for through the 1903 and 1904 seasons, but the foundation had been laid, and the coup had occurred. Portland baseball would belong to the PCL on and off for another 99 years.

The '03-'04 "Browns" and the beginnings of the PCL
The first season for Portland in the PCL, was pretty much as it's last season in the PNL was… bad. That 1903 season would see only one bright spot: Ed "Deacon" Van Buren, a holdover from the season before, Van Buren would post a .361 BA, and establish a team record of 281 hits. The '04 team would fare worse placing dead last with a 79-136 record. Maybe the stress and strain of the "baseball war" was the reason for the performance. It seems that brighter days, and a winning record would be in order for the '05 season, as the final shareholders that had been holding out in favor of the PNL shifted allegiance, and President Lucas gave in, thus ending one of the worst "baseball wars" the minors have ever seen.

They finished second to last and had a 95-108 record for the year. Below is the breakdown of the team for that inaugural season:

Manager - S. Vigneaux/B. Ely
Record - W-95 L-108
Finished - 5th

Player

Position

AB

HR

RBI

BA

SB

J. Freeman

1B

184

--

--

.304

5

A. Anderson

2B

663

--

--

.279

32

I. Francis

3B

401

--

--

.278

7

J Raidy

SS

382

--

--

.257

22

P. Nadeau

OF

791

--

--

.348

52

D. Van Buren

OF

779

--

--

.361

65

H. Blake

OF

414

--

--

.254

20

D. Shea

C

311

--

--

.219

7

             

J. Andrews (1)

3B

395

--

--

.281

24

Hollingsworth

SS

379

--

--

.261

14

S. Vigneaux

1C

247

--

--

.194

14

T. Hess

C

207

--

--

.266

2

PITCHERS

Player

IP

W-L

BB

SO

ERA

I Butler

--

21-31

--

--

--

C. Shields

--

19-23

--

--

--

J. Thielman

--

18-7

--

--

--

D. McFarlan (2)

--

14-22

--

--

--

  1. Also with Seattle
  2. Also with Sacramento

The Browns become The Giants
1905 brought a new owner in one Judge William Wallace McCredie, his nephew Walter, and a name change to the team. The Browns were renamed the Giants, but the change has little effect on the teams dismal performance. Finishing second to last, the team played a majority of it's games away from Vaughn St. Park, as the Lewis and Clark Exposition was that year, as the National track and field championship was being played in Portland, and these events far outclassed the baseball team. OF this team Larry Schlaffy was the only show. Schlaffy would record 77 stolen bases and would go down as the first of only 4 players in team history to pull off an unassisted triple play. The Oregonian in it's summary of the season said simply, "The less said the better." The outfielder with the uncle owner would rule the roost as manager from that year until 1922.

Walter McCredie and the Portland Beavers
Walter McCredie was not brilliant his first season in Portland, but he was consistent in that year of 1904: He batted .300 in 516 AB. It is after his uncle the Judge purchased the team that McCredie became the manager and charted the course for the team through it's first 5 championships. It is also at this time that another longstanding change would occur. The team decided that yet another name change was in order, but this time it was decided that the good people in the Portland area should make the decision. So just after the start of the 1906 season, a name was selected by a Portland telegram contest. From here on out the team would be named the Beavers.

1906 was an outstanding season for the newly named team. The team sported a .657 winning percentage for the year with a 115-60 record. Below is the stats for that season:
Manager - W. McCreedie
Record - W- 115 L-60
Finished - 1st
NOTE: No Playoffs this season.

Player

Position

AB

HR

RBI

BA

SB

P. Lister

1B

500

0

--

.218

10

B. Sweeney

2B

526

0

--

.283

39

L. McLean

3B

248

2

--

.355

10

J. Smith

SS

507

0

--

.274

25

J. McHale

OF

592

1

--

.311

47

M. Mitchell

OF

578

6

--

.351

33

W. McCreedie

OF

486

2

--

.309

20

O. Moore (1)

C

455

0

--

.198

8

             

P. Donahue

C

313

0

--

.233

8

B. Henderson

P

179

2

--

.268

3

A. Schimpff

P

134

0

--

.305

6

PITCHERS

Player

IP

W-L

BB

SO

ERA

E. Califf

--

34-14

--

--

--

B. Henderson

--

29-10

--

--

--

B. Essick

--

19-6

--

--

--

F. Gum

--

16-7

--

--

--

A. Schimpff

--

6-3

--

--

--

W. French

--

3-2

--

--

--

C. Moore

--

3-2

--

--

--



Highlights of that winning season were Michael Mitchell who led the league in batting with a .351 BA in 578 AB. Pitcher Benny Henderson had a 29-10 record, the best winning percentage in Beavers history. The year would not see a playoff though, as the Beavers were in Oakland on April 18th when the great quake hit San Francisco, nearly destroying it by quake and fire.

The loss of games and teams that '06 season to the PCL had a ripple effect, and the 1907 season was played by only 4 teams. While the earthquake had leveled San Francisco, the team survived. LA, Oakland, San Francisco and Portland limped through the season with Portland going first to worst in one year. Only pitcher Bob Groom's no-hitter, the first no-hitter in Beavers history gave any light to another wise dark, and 1908 season.

More on the McCredie Years
McCredie's Beavers teams would continue doing well the next few seasons. 1909 and '10 would see the Beavers finish second in the league (now 6 teams in strength: Portland, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Oakland, along with newly added Sacramento, and Vernon, CA.).

The following 1910-1911, and the 1913-1914 seasons would see the manager win his last two pennants. The secret to the Beavers success those two seasons was pitching… and nothing but pitching. In 1910 the team BA was a transparent .218 for the season. Four pitchers went a world record 88 consecutive shutout innings. They were Sylvanus "Vean" Gregg, Gene Krapp, Bill Steen, and Jesse Garrett.

Krapp would go on to the Majors and pitch for the Cleveland Naps, and the Buffalo Buffeds of the Federal League. The same would go for "Vean" Gregg. He would play for the Cleveland Naps, the Boston Red Sox, the Philadelphia Athletics, and the Washington Senators. His ERA was a staggering 1.80 in 1911 with the Naps. That season would also see him have a 23-7 record. The years 1912 and '13 would each see him throw 34 complete games. Excluding the 1925 season with the Senators where he only started 5 games with a 2-2 record, his ERA never got above 4. His career high for innings pitched in a season was a healthy 285.7.Beyond his accomplishments in the Majors, Gregg's 1910 season in the minors would pave his way in spectacular fashion.

He had 32 wins, a no hitter, three one hitters, he completed 43 of 51 games. His 14 shutouts were a league record, and he set a club record of 368 strikeouts in 387 innings including 14 in one game and 16 in an extra inning game. He once struck out 8 consecutive batters, which was just a hair under his 8.56 per game average. And in one game that season he struck out every batter (10 in all) at least once.

Batting was poor those years, but fielding was not. One of them was shortstop that played on the 1911 team. His BA was sub-par (.258), but he was fleet of foot (35 SB), but had great hands and a healthy arm. That shortstop was one Roger Peckinpaugh. He must have impressed his affiliated Cleveland Naps GM, as he quickly was moved up to the majors in 1910 at the rip age of 19. Here Peckinpaugh would find a home playing 17 seasons in the majors. 1910-13 he played for the a fore mentioned Cleveland Naps. In the middle of the 1913 season he was traded to the NY Yankees where he would play for another 8 full seasons. In 1922 he went to the Washington Senators where he played till 1926. And he finished his career in 1927 with the White Sox.

This is what the "Diamond Angle" has to say about Peckinpaugh:

Although his career lasted 17 seasons, he was a semi-regular in 1913, and played full time only from 1914-1925, so he didn't put up huge numbers. He was a shortstop in the days when shortstops were expected to be outstanding on defense and any offense was a bonus. His career average was .259, and he got on base 33.6 % of the times he came to the plate. He stole 205 bases in an era when steals were de-emphasized, included a career best 38 in 1914.

He was a Yankee through the teens and when they became great with the addition of Babe Ruth in 1920, and on their first pennant winning team in 1921. He then took his wares to DC, where he helped an aging Walter Johnson, plus Sam Rice, Goose Goslin and his double play partner, Bucky Harris, to World Series' in 1924 and '25. And 1925, his last regular season, he was the AL MVP, hitting .294.

Like Bill Buckner, he attained his greatest fame as a World Series goat. In the 1925 World Series against Pittsburgh, the steady veteran who was once considered the best shortstops in the league, made 8 errors in the seven game contest. The wise acres said he should have gotten a second MVP award: in the World Series, for the Pirates. Built along the lines of Honus Wagner, he was not at all flashy, with his broad shoulders and bow legs, but he covered more ground than many a more lithe man.

Other career highlights include a 29-game hitting streak in 1919, and a record 168 double plays turned with Harris in 1922. Before his unfortunate display in the 1925 Series, he was a hero in '24, doubling home the winning run in Game Two and saving the sixth game with a spectacular play. He managed the Yanks briefly during the 1914 season--when he was but 23 years old--and went on to manage the Indians after he retired. He later was promoted to general manger of the Tribe.

Vaughn St. additions. Bad times for the Beavers, and the country
In 1912 Judge McCredie had pretty much remodeled the Vaughn St. Park, and he may have been the precursor to the modern ballpark owner… he added the first known Luxury Boxes. The additions to the park were a marketed raising of the bar… a grandstand offering seating for 5,580 and 280 box seats. It would seem that big money would be right around the corner, right? Wrong. The next few seasons were poor for the Beavers, Portland Baseball, and the country. The following year after the pennant saw Portland go, once again from first to worst with a 78-116 record. The team limped along in bottom of the standings, until something happened in 1918 that altered the landscape of the nation, and therefore baseball.

World War I had been raging across the fields and trenches of Europe since Aug. of 1914, but it had been a part of the news, and with the sinking of the Lusitania was sunk in May of 1915, the US had slowly started to prepare to defend itself, but also arm itself in preparation for entry into the war. In April of 1917 the US officially declared war on Germany. Baseball was effected by the restrictions on travel in the season of 1918. Portland didn't even field a team that year, and Walter McCredie went to Salt Lake to manage there until his return the following season.

For 10 seasons there was a drop off in what had made the Beavers winners: pitching. And while the pitching drowned in rising ERA, the batting did have some sluggers that would be highlights. In 1920 the last place Beavers had George Maisel. An Outfielder, Maisel hit .323 for the season. He had been picked up from the Majors after playing for the 1913 St. Louis Browns, and in 1916 for the Detroit Tigers. He would leave the Beavers in '21 for the Chicago Cubs where he hit for .310 for the season, but would play in just 30 games the following season to finish his career in the Majors with a .190 BA for the season.

So, the stage would be set for the '20s. Vaughn Street would continue to be the place where Portland would see some of the finest players of it's day play. The 30's would see a player, not from the Beavers, but from the Padres be discovered at Vaughn St. taking batting practice, who would symbolize hitting, and take that part of the game into the realm of science. It would see Joltin' Joe, and Jim Thorpe, Billy Southworth, and may others.

Vaughn St., and Portland were no longer infants introducing the game to the city. From now on it would be out of it's adolescence, for better or worse.